Archive for the ‘Burger’ Category

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Watch the meatloaf dance… into sliders

September 20, 2006

If you’ve made the meatloaf below, you can make these sliders, too!!

Backgrounder:

For those of you not from the Midwestern US or not burger aficionados, ‘slider’ is a term coined to describe small burgers that can be eaten in a few bites. The term is most commonly associated with White Castle hamburgers. They also get colorful names like ‘gut bombs’ or the more practical name ‘mini-burgers,’ which is showing up on menus at large chain restaurants. Either way, the wife and I think of them as sliders. Enjoy!

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Poor little bun…

August 7, 2006

Breakfast burger’s revenge.

Look at the poor little bun, crushed under the weight of carmelized onions, bacon, quail egg and — let’s not forget — a big hunk of beef. Oh yeah, and cheese. Seeing what’s happened to its bottom, the top of the bun refuses to get involved with this burger.

It doesn’t look healthy right? Well, remember what Atkins said: The only thing truly bad for you in this picture IS that little bun. And it’s so puny, even Atkins couldn’t really object. (Actually, we don’t follow Atkins. We only use his philosophy when we need to rationalize consuming large quantities of meat.)

As huge as this burger looks — and really, it was only slightly bigger than a slider — it’s a peanut compared with the burger that inspired it. My husband tells you about it here:

My wife and I were in London not long ago. My parents (this will become a nebulous term the longer you read this site) are unadventurous eaters. They took us to this place near Old Bond Street called the Automat. The restaurant bills itself as an American Brasserie. It is always fun to see our cuisine (my wife and I are Americans) translated back to us. The most remarkable aspect of the meal to me was the Automat’s breakfast burger, which I ordered. The burger was so large, piled with very interesting meats and an egg, that I barely finished it. So this burger is a translation of a translation back to its native tongue. Let me know what you think.

Intrigued, right?

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